Drug Education News

News and views from the Drug Education Forum

Thematic paper on indicated prevention

indicated-prevention3The EMCDDA have a new paper on indicated prevention, for those of us who might not have come across this phrase before they explain:

Indicated prevention is a relatively new branch of drug prevention and can be seen as the third part of the ‘prevention chain’, after universal and selective prevention. Its aim is not necessarily to prevent drug use or initiation to it, but rather to prevent the development of dependence, diminish frequency of use and avert ‘dangerous’ patterns of substance use (e.g. moderate instead of binge-drinking).

Whilst I’d be lying if I said I’ve had a chance to read the paper in full I have had a quick look at the conclusions drawn, which the authors sumarise:

First, there is a clear need for new programmes for at-risk groups that until now have received little attention, such as children in foster care or children placed in institutions and/or child psychiatric patients. Secondly, in all the fields where children with problem behaviour are screened in schools, in a family, in peer recruitment, or work context the instruments used to identify these groups must be harmonised across Europe. Finally, those interventions that were found to meet the highest standards in the classification (level 3) should be implemented in other countries — if necessary, adapted to national systems and culture.

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Filed under: drug prevention

2 Responses

  1. […] an important role for schools (and we’ve highlighted the EMCDDA paper on indicated prevention here). The Australian authors say: Where students have been identified as being at risk of developing […]

  2. […] an important role for schools (and we’ve highlighted the EMCDDA paper on indicated prevention here). The Australian authors say: Where students have been identified as being at risk of developing […]

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